Substantive Education

September 23, 2008

Forever Free- Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation

Just a heads up that this exhibit will be at the Ronald Regan Presidential Library for the next month. We won’t be able to go there as a group, but it would be a great family trip.

Friday, August 22, 2008-Friday, October 24, 2008

Forever Free – Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation:

• On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed, “[that] all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State…shall be then, thenceforward… forever free.” And thus began the Emancipation Proclamation, a presidential order which freed slaves in those States that did not return to Union control. Forever Free – Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, a new exhibition designed and staged by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, follows the story of slavery and Abraham Lincoln’s role in ending it.

Running August 22, 2008 through October 24, 2008, Forever Free will provide a glimpse into Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. The exhibit will include hand-signed letters and manuscripts by Abraham Lincoln, including a California Emancipation Proclamation – a copy printed in California in 1864 and signed by President Lincoln for commemorative purposes, one of only three known to exist. The exhibit will also display some of Abraham Lincoln’s personal effects, including a handkerchief monogrammed by Mary Todd Lincoln, an 1831 law book from the Lincoln-Herndon Law Office in Springfield, Illinois and a Paris porcelain purple ground chamber pot from the Lincoln White House. The exhibit will also contain a photographical timeline of slavery throughout the ages, beginning with the 1760 B.C. Code of Hammurabi which declared that slaves could be sold or inherited and ending with the proposal and ratification of the Constitution’s 13th amendment in 1865 stating that “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude…shall exist within the United States…”

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